MLB All-Star Game 2019

Our MLB All-Star Game collection was inspired by the long history of this event, filled with incredible moments that ignited a love for baseball across generations. Take a walk with us down memory lane to learn more about the special insignias chosen for this capsule.

In 1933, Chicago Mayor Edward J. Kelly approached the publisher of the Chicago Tribune seeking sporting event ideas for the city’s World Fair. The paper’s sports editor, Art Ward, wanted to boost morale during the midst of the Great Depression, and pitched the idea of fans voting for their favorite athletes to play against each other in a friendly game of baseball. Additionally, the game’s ticket sales were to be donated to charities benefitting former players living with physical disabilities. The “Game of the Century” was played on July 6, 1933, in Chicago’s Comiskey Park, and the Midsummer Classic was born.

The 1949 All-Star Game in Brooklyn, New York marked history as the first time African-American players were featured in the Midsummer Classic. Ebbets Field had 32,577 in attendance as the legendary #42 Jackie Robinson played alongside teammates Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe, as well as American League outfielder Larry Doby.

The 1982 All-Star Game played at Olympic Stadium in Montreal, Quebec was the first to be hosted outside of the United States. Five Expos players, including Hall of Fame members Gary Carter and Tim Raines, played in the National League’s 4-1 victory. 

At the 1999 Midsummer Classic, the most recent to be played at Fenway Park, Red Sox legend Ted Williams threw the ceremonial first pitch. The home Boston crowd was treated to an MVP performance from Pedro Martinez, the first pitcher to begin the All-Star Game by striking out the side. The American League emerged victorious by a score of 4-1, as well as in the Home Run Derby with Ken Griffey, Jr.’s 16 home runs.

The New York Yankees hosted the 2008 All-Star Game, which would be the last ever played at the original Yankee Stadium. Red Sox outfielder J.D. Drew hit a game-tying two-run homer in the seventh inning, and was later named MVP after the American League won 4-3 in fifteen innings.